Lessons from a Luncheon.

I attended the 14th annual WCBS 880 Working Women’s Luncheon this afternoon. One of my professors, Mary Alice Williams, extended the invite to journalism students to have a chance to network and learn a few things about broadcast journalism. I’m really glad I went, for I learned so much in the two hours I was there.

WCBS-TV co-anchor Kristine Johnson was the guest, with Pat Carroll, an anchor of the WCBS 880 Morning News, as host of the interview and Q&A session. I learned a lot from what both women had to say. It was a little comforting, given the growing uncertainty of my chosen career field, and following the firing of Jill Abramson at the New York Times amid all the inequality and lack of diversity in newsrooms around the US, and, dare I say, the world.

Johnson and I have similar backgrounds, in the sense that we both moved around a lot while young (she was a military brat, and myself being a diplobrat). She, too, had an epiphany of getting into journalism while starting at college at the University of Nebraska. And, she minored in political science as well.

She gave some great advice for the few students present. Regarding internships, Johnson said to “be proactive, don’t be shy, introduce yourself, and ask if you can take on more responsibilities.” She added that what she learned behind the scenes helped her get to where she is today. That is the whole point of doing internships, after all. Now it’s just a matter of getting one.

It was comforting to hear that throughout her career her patience was tested “so many times.” A news director once told her that reporting was out of her reach, but she clearly proved him wrong. Johnson also said that in this profession of journalism, “you have to have a clear mind, it really helps.”

Calling attention to your strengths, especially as a woman in this male-dominated world, is very important. You have to remind people every now and then. Having genuine passion doesn’t hurt, either, as well as wanting to be challenged every day.

One question an attendee asked was about the thin line women face when being perceived as assertive or aggressive. “There are times where I feel like you have to be the B-word, especially for something you feel strongly about,” Johnson replied. “Because I don’t always show that side, people listen [to what I have to say]. Also [having] confidence, how you treat everyone [from the janitor to your supervisor]. Choose your battles carefully.”

I did ask about how she felt about Abramson being fired and how it may affect women in the media, but she said that we all don’t really know what happened.

Johnson stressed that “a good anchor needs to be a good reporter.” This brought to mind something another anchor on another network said to me earlier this year on a tour. He said something along the lines of, “Now they’re just hiring anchors with pretty faces with no reporting experience.” Johnson knows what producers, directors and camera operators want, and that really helps with her broadcasts.

“My success came in being myself,” adding that she’s very thankful for her failures. She likened co-anchoring to dating, “[chemistry] is either there or not.” Carroll added, “It’s like ballroom dancing or figure skating.”

I know I’m not the only who feels that “social media expertise” is not as important as being a good writer/reporter/editor, but that is the reality of this business. Johnson is a self-professed reluctant Twitter, but she does recognize that it is a great platform, especially when interacting with her audience. “As a mother, it scares me. There’s a lot to keep track of.” True, but we can’t deny it can be a great news wire service that you can customize, depending on who you follow, etc.

A woman approached me at the end of the luncheon. She had not heard my question, which was, “How do you feel about Jill Abramson being fired from the New York Times and how it could affect women in the business?” She said it was a great question, but it obviously was a difficult one to answer, especially with how recent the episode was.

I mentioned an article by David Carr, an obvious insider to the event. In his latest Media Equation column, he had heard from some of his younger female colleagues. One of them said, “I really don’t see a path for me here. Are we O.K.?”

I’m wondering the same thing. It’s great that there’s a little more diversity in top editorial positions with Dean Baquet replacing Abramson, but I’m female. And Black. The woman who approached me simply said, “That’s something you could work towards.”

Yeah, I could work towards that, but just how many more obstacles are in my way now? I can’t even get an internship.

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Fast Company’s (Possibly Innocent) Mistake

Early Tuesday morning, August 26, Ann Charles’ piece on what she believed to be 25 of the Smartest Women on Twitter was published. Surely enough, it was shared on social media, especially Twitter, where it was received not so well amongst those of color.

As many of the people I happen to follow pointed out, there is not one Black woman on the list, let alone not enough diversity for a brand/magazine that prides itself on “inspiring readers to think beyond traditional boundaries & create the future of business” (via Fast Company’s Twitter bio).

This led to many intelligent, practical,  and opinionated netizens to come up with their own lists, quite a few them holding more than 25 members. Not to say that the women on Charles’ list are not great role models or anything, but it did strike a cord in those who are in minority groups in America today (why we are still considered minorities is something I’ll never understand, but oh well). The lists had women of all backgrounds and different fields having done things that have contributed to the public’s understanding of the world we live in today, be it technology, activism, journalism, writing, and so on.

It was nice to see that Fast Company took notice and tried to make amends by publishing More on Those Smartest Women on Twitter, where they said, “We squandered the opportunity to do the same with our initial Twitter list” when trying to re-affirm what they state in their Twitter bio. They even asked for more feedback on who else readers would add to the list, with a “please”.

This got me thinking. While some may have just looked over the  original list and paid attention to the accomplishments of mentioned women, many felt some type of way when they did not see someone they could easily identify with. Charles even wrote that making the list “[included] seeking out the most influential and profound leaders across a diverse set of industries and interests. As the Twitter ecosystem continues to grow, it’s an ongoing challenge to find new, unique, and interesting sources of information with fresh points of view.”

Yes, there are a lot of people on Twitter today – about 554,750,000 active users as of early last month. So this was daunting task for Charles, and a matter of her own opinion. I’m not saying that this was a bad list; just that certain demographics did not feel represented well, if at all.

With more women chipping away at the countless glass ceilings in this man’s world, it was refreshing to see both women and men make up their own minds as to who else is contributing to attempting to make this world more equal for all. We all are different, yet we all have a sense of wanting to belong somewhere, especially with people we can see ourselves in.

Hopefully this will bring more attention to movers and shakers of color.

My Bad, Y’all

There will be some “bad” words used.

I just watched Ms. Deen ask “beg” forgiveness for her comments made to an African American employee a few years back while planning for her brother’s wedding. I was not feeling it. I was also not surprised that she used such words. She is an older, white Southern woman. Really, a lot more people use “nigger”, “nigga”, “nigguh”, etc. than you may realize.

Then there’s the fact that she is famous, somewhat. She’s a popular TV chef on the Food Network. I’m not a fan of her cooking, it does not look healthy or very much appetizing, but that’s just my humble opinion. Anyways, what I’m trying to get at is that we live in a world that is fairly obsessed with those in the public eye. Some of us feel that we own celebrities, that they owe us whenever they do something we may not approve of. Sometimes, we forgive them. Other times, we ridicule them further, even shun them.

Paula was… picked at quite a bit. #PaulasBestDishes was the top trending topic in the U.S. this past Wednesday, and boy, some made me laugh until I teared up, I’m not going to lie. I was not necessarily laughing at her, but I was thinking that in some way she had brought this on herself. Her forgiveness video was choppy, with flashes of white, her facial expressions were distracting, to me at least. If she really was sorry, it just did not come through.

I recall someone I used to follow on Twitter say that racism is dead, and that we should be worrying more about classism. I thought to myself, this person is wrong. While classism may seem more prevelant, racism is not going away, and never will. We as the human race may grow more tolerant, but there will always be some prejudice deep down inside every single being. There is not one person alive without any form of dislike, hate, dread, etc. We are not perfect, y’all.

Paula Deen has angered a lot of people, especially those who weren’t so familiar with her before this lawsuit came to light. As I read tweets and laugh, shake my head and frown, I know to many of those offended that this is too little, maybe on time but all the same too late.

I’m going to end on this note. It’s interesting how we clutch to the really ugly stuff of a person, celebrity or otherwise. When they try to (or try to appear to) rectify their displeasing mistakes, it may not be easy to win people back. I guess we’ll just have to wait and see how this plays out. Frankly, I’m fairly over it, and this will not be the last time someone we may invite into our lives via cable may rub us the way.